Volunteer

Join us! We are always looking enthusiastic volunteers. There is plenty to do from surveying rivers for invasive species to helping out at events and developing promotional material.

Volunteering with West Cumbria Rivers Trust is a great way to learn about our work and enjoy the local countryside while doing your bit for the environment.

Upcoming Events

Watch this space for details of our volunteering days.

River Watchers

Could you be our eyes and ears out on the river? We would like to see all the rivers in streams in West Cumbria in good condition; with no pollution, providing habitat for a range of wildlife and being enjoyed by everyone. In order to do this we need to understand the current condition of our rivers and streams so we can prioritise where we work and try to address any issues. Help us collect this information by filling in a simple survey about a stream or river near you. 

Fill in one form per kilometre, or less if the characteristics of the river and surrounding land use change.  A paper version of the survey to take to the river can be downloaded here. Upload your results to our database using this link.

Remember, if you see a pollution incident report it to the Environment Agency on 0800 807060

Record invasive species sightings to PlantTracker. You will need to take a photograph to verify your record.

Staff Environmental Leave Days 

Why not organise an Environmental Leave day for yours staff? It’s great for team building and while you may not hear the ka-ching of the cash register, you’ll hear the babbling brook and the tweeting of birds! Your staff will be smiling inside and out knowing they’ve done their bit for the environment.

Toad Patrol

What is a toad patrol?

Every year volunteers across the country go out at night to help amphibians (frogs, toads and newts) on their spring migration to cross busy roads. Toads on Roads is a citizen science project, coordinated by the amphibian and reptile charity Froglife, that collects data from different toad patrols and uses it to help support research. They host a map of different crossing sites which you can add to if you know of roads where animals are being run over (note: reporting a crossing does not mean it will be patrolled)

Find out more here